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Local Vendor Spotlight: Third Coast Coffee

1. How long has Third Coast Coffee been in business?

Joe Lozano began roasting coffee in 1994 and opened Los Armadillos Coffee. Most of his working life had been in restaurants and kitchens so when the opportunity to roast coffee came up, he thought it wouldn’t be so hard to do with the experience he had. That didn’t turn out to be so true, but after much trial and error, he had the opportunity to buy Third Coast Coffee in 2008. We’ve been fine tuning our roasts and expanding every year since. 

2. What practices set you apart from others?

We’re an artisan roaster because roasting coffee is an art. Third Coast only roasts coffee to order so you’re guaranteed a fresh cup of with every bag. We control each roast by hand, eye, and nose. Our roasting machines are lovingly maintained 12 kilo drum roasters and we follow rigorous protocol, including set batch sizes for all roasts that guarantees the results we seek. We are part of the world’s only coffee buying cooperative that has 21 roaster members spread throughout the United States and Canada. Our members are committed to sourcing sustainably grown coffees and partner closely with the farmers who grow it. By importing directly from the farmers, the co-op does business in a way that creates a fairer, more transparent and sustainable system of coffee trade that directly benefits the farmers, and their families and communities. 

3. How do you source your beans and from where?

As a founding member of Cooperative Coffees, Third Coast Coffee directly imports coffee from small farmer cooperatives throughout Central and South America, Asia, Africa, and Indonesia. We make year long commitments for our green coffee to ensure reliable and steady supply of the many varieties that we offer. We always want to make sure the farmers are effectively rewarded for their efforts. We also want to respect their hard work by crafting the finest roasts possible, extending that dialogue to include coffee drinker, roaster, and grower. Cooperative Coffees goal is to make coffee growing a sustainable and beneficial endeavor for families and their communities. We understand the basic needs of our trading partners and facilitate access to specific expertise to help small scale farmers improve their production capabilities and meet their basic needs. We measure the impact of our relationships not only economically, but also in terms of overall quality of life for our partners and their communities. 

4. What are some of your favorite things/departments at Wheatsville?

The donuts! We’re (mostly) kidding. I think we can all agree that love that Wheatsville is a co-op. We know how important is for coops to work with other coops and we’re honored to work so closely with you! 

5. Do you have a favorite/cool tips or recipe?

Tip: We always recommend 2 tablespoons of coffee to 6oz of water for any coffee brewer.

For a sweet treat, try
Jes’ Vegan Chocolate Espresso Muffins

3/4 c all purpose flour (or sub oat flour for GF option) 
1/3 c brewed Third Coast Coffee espresso
1/4 c unsweetened cocoa powder
1/4 c coconut sugar
3 T maple syrup
1 T vinegar
2 T vegetable oil (or melted coconut oil) 
1 heaping teaspoon baking soda
pinch of salt

1. Preheat oven to 350°F and line a muffin tin with liners. 
2. Sift flour, cocoa powder, coconut sugar, baking soda, and salt together in a medium sized bowl and whisk until well combined. 
3. In a separate small bowl, mix together espresso, vinegar, maple
    syrup, and oil. 
4. Pour wet ingredients into dry and mix until just combined. 
5. Pour batter into the muffin tin filling them about 2/3 of the way. 
6. Bake for 15 - 18 min. or until a toothpick inserted comes out clean. 
7. Remove from oven, let cool completely. Top with melted vegan
    chocolate mixed with coffee and sliced almonds if desired. 

6. Do you have anything new in the works?

We recently acquired our first micro-lot coffee from Peru. Señor Vasquez owns a 4 hectare farm where he carefully looks after his coffee trees, keeps bees for pollination and tries to harvest the ripe coffee cherries when the moon is full. He oversees the fermentation and initial drying process on his own plot before taking them for final processing. We’re going to be buying more specialty coffees from other micro-lot farms in other countries where we source our beans. 

If there is anything additional that you would like to share...

At the end of October, Joe will be traveling to Honduras for a soil symposium. Producer partners and roaster partners will meet to combat the Roya fungus, which has been slowly killing crops across the coffee plane. Roya is an airborne fungus that essentially stops the photosynthesis process of the trees and cannot be treated without the use of chemicals and pesticides. This trip to Honduras will test different ways of managing soil, experimenting with seedlings, and trying to combat Roya while still remaining organic. Joe makes several origin trips each year and has visited all of our producer partners over time. Last year he traveled to Sumatra and Colombia while Logan, another roaster has been to visit our Mexico and Guatemala partners.


Local Vendor Spotlight: FOND Bone Broth

Anna Obert and Alysa Seeland, co-founders of FOND Bone Broth, kindly answered a few questions to help us know more about their company.

Tell us about the name of your company, Fond Bone Broth.

FOND is french for “base” or “foundation.” We want people to see us as the foundation of their culinary and nutritional life - the first thing they reach for when they need a delicious meal, the first thing they think of when their body needs a boost. For too long taste and culinary craft were thought to be separate from nourishment. We came to believe that good tasting food was an indulgence and nourishing food was to be tolerated. The solution? FOND Bone Broth™. Whether you use it to elevate a meal or as a drink to nourish your body whole, our goal is to bring nourishing food to the height of culinary taste and ingenuity!

How long have you been making bone broths? Did you start for personal use? What made you start offering it for sale?

I used bone broth in my cooking for years — since I opened my first cook book — but drinking bone broth was a last ditch effort to find relief from a long history of medical complications. At the time I was taking $400 a month of quality supplements that were not being absorbed in my body. After seeing the dramatic benefits of drinking bone broth, I started telling others to drink it too. But there were two barriers: it was difficult to make (even find the ingredients to do it the right way) and even more difficult to flavor. So we decided to do it for you, to make it delicious and delightful and to support local farmers in the process who make this nourishing food even possible.

While it was started from a personal journey, our team is integral in creating the experience you have when you open the jar. From the care in production (still hand-crafted!) to the aesthetics on the label, our team’s commitment to excellence and the love and care of the land is the reason our product is set apart.

What farms do you work with to get your produce and animals?

We work with COBB Creek Ranch, Tandem Farm Company, Parker Creek Ranch, Braune Family Farms, Markley Family Farms, Johnson’s Backyard Organics, and many others on a case-by-case basis. We add to the list of farmers we work with weekly. We are ALWAYS looking to work with and support more and more farmers and we invite farmers who are intentional about their growing practices to reach out to us!

What’s your favorite flavor? I think mine is Liquid Light. I made a chicken and pasta dish with a light creamy sauce using Liquid Light and it was the most delicious thing I’ve EVER cooked.

Everyone on the team has their own favorite for sure, our Founder’s favorite for cooking is Trolley Dodger, but for drinking it is The Spur. The customer darling is definitely Youth Tonic and a close second is Liquid Light so to each their own! 

Can you share a simple recipe, one that might not be obvious?


2 TB oil (we use ghee)
2 TB flour (we use non-gmo, organic heritage wheat but even coconut flour will do!)
4oz of Trolley Dodger
pinch of pink salt

Melt oil in a pan, add flour whisk together and let cook for 2 minutes - mixture will start to brown. Add Trolley Dodger whisking continually until the mixture thickens. This recipe is GOLD it will have you saying “put a roux on it” for every culinary instance going forward. Over easy eggs, roasted veggies, fresh tomatoes, french fries, chicken, potatoes - something delicious, something to nourish!

Are there any new products or broth flavors on the horizon?
We are always working on a new flavors, we’ll be launching one every month this fall and winter and will debut a new one shortly in October, but we’re also working hard on a fish broth. The primary issue with fish broth is finding a sustainable source. Our first journey was out the backdoor to the pasture, now we’re heading out to sea!

What are some of your favorite foods to buy at Wheatsville?
There are so many! We love SRSLY Chocolate (almond sea salt can’t be beat!), we’re also big fans of Argus cider, Cuveé coffee is swoon-worthy, but we also love the many farmers that Wheatsville supports like EIEO Farms, Engel Farms, and Prickly Pair Farms.


Local Vendor Spotlight: 4th Tap Cooperative Brewery

4th Tap co-founder and President, John Stecker, shared some info and insight about the first worker-owned cooperatively-governed brewery in Texas.

1. Can you tell me how 4th Tap got started?

We had all been homebrewers for a very long time, and we slowly built into a weekly “club” event. We were clearly doing something right because we began to get increasingly frequent requests to send beer out to events. We spent many years brewing weekly and sending our beer out to parties, weddings, SXSW events, etc., which really helped us to develop our unique approach to beer styles. It will be six years this December when we decided to make a real go at opening a production brewery, and from when we came up with the name 4th Tap Brewing Cooperative. At the time, we already had strong biochemistry and engineering backgrounds, but we recognized we needed more. Chris Hamje went to work in the Black Star Co-op brewery for a number of years while I spent time getting a crash course in business education while working at another company here in Austin. We also went through the Cooperation Texas training program to learn more about how to build and participate in a worker-cooperative. From there, it was raising the money, finding a location, and getting it built. That last sentence really does not do justice to the absurd amount of work it took to get from idea to functioning brewery. Bottom line, a whole lot of real sweat and blood went into building this place.

2. What are some of the challenges and benefits of being the first worker-owned cooperatively-governed brewery in Texas?

Explaining what a worker-cooperative is to just about everyone! Second, answering the question, “why didn’t you just open as an LLC?” which I am sure we have still not answered to many people’s satisfaction — but we don’t really care. We believe in our structure, and that is, ultimately, all that matters. Beyond those two questions, there have been plenty of business and legal hurdles. From working with credit unions, taxes, loans, and TABC/TTB filings, everything is a bit more difficult. It has also been compounded by the fact that Texas views us as a non-profit organization while the federal government views us a for-profit. One of our core principles here is the triple bottom line— people, planet, and profits— so that has been a point of frustration at times. As for benefits? Our team. We have an amazingly dedicated and passionate team that share in the work load to such a high degree. They go so far above and beyond and I have to attribute some of that to our model.

3. What are some of your favorite pairings or recipes using 4th Tap beers?

The Renewal, with spicy food, will do you right. The tart, almost mild-sour quality from the real tamarind does a great job of balancing a good spicy dish. We’ve also received messages and pictures from people who have used our Sun Eater to make rosemary lemon bread, and to marinate a chicken breast for a rosemary chicken dinner. Our Long Walk really goes well with a romaine and mandarin orange salad. Also, surprisingly, gingers snaps and Long Walk. Seriously, give that a try.

4. Tell us a little about your beers and your brewing philosophy. What makes 4th Tap unique?

There are so many beers being brewed in Texas, especially in Austin, and much of it is really, really good. Just from Austin alone, I can go out and find great examples of most styles of beer. For that reason, we wanted to make sure that we brought something new to the table. We focus on creating out-of-style, interesting, but still very drinkable beers made for our home here in Texas. We also spend time looking for local or exciting ingredients that can really enhance the qualities we like in different styles of beer. We don’t add ingredients to a beer for the novelty of it, or just to punch you in the tongue with it. If we’re adding something different, we’re adding it for a good reason.

5. What are some of your favorite things about Wheatsville Co-op?

Short lines! Seriously, I hate waiting in long lines and Wheatsville keeps them in check! In broader sense, we love that Wheatsville makes it a priority to not just provide local and organic food, but to often communicate the story of the suppliers. Wheatsville is a supporter of the local food economy, which supports the local financial economy, and that is an important and worthy undertaking. Wheatsville is also a living and breathing example of a cooperative business model in action! Also, I appreciate Wheatsville being the neighborhood grocery store back in my north-campus-living college days. Y’all kept me fed!


Higher Wages and Lower Prices

Shop Wheatsville and MAKE CHANGE!

Yep, you read it right. As we all know the cost of living is going up in Austin, and in order to keep our co-op staff members healthy and happy, Wheatsville has increased entry level wages for all staff member to $13.01 as of January 4, 2016. Compensation includes a full benefits package in addition to 401K eligibility for full-time employees. The $3+ increase in entry level wages affected over 80% of staff members employed by Wheatsville Food Co-op.

Since 1976 the co-op has been on the leading edge of social change, now 40 years later, the co-op continues along that path with a new generation of forward-thinking, progressive leadership. In order to make sure we stay in alignment with the cost of living we’re using nationally indexed figures that are updated annually. In addition, entry level wages will be reviewed every year to make sure the co-op is in alignment with market changes that may affect the overall cost of living.

Wheatsville gained valuable insight and help tackling wage satisfaction by working with National Co-op Grocers co-op and creating a livable wage and benefits model that can be replicated in co-ops across the country, whose staff are also struggling with significant cost of living increases.

So how do we pay for our wage increases? Well, we’ve done a lot of work finding ways we can work smarter and keep our stores humming along but the other part of it comes from you - and it’s actually pretty simple – GROW SALES!

Thanks for making Wheatsville Food Co-op one of the best food co-ops in the country! We’re 40 and keep getting better and better. It’s no accident – it takes everyone tugging just a little harder on their side to raise this barn – and we appreciate our almost 20,000 owners and shoppers that give us a hand. THANK YOU for an amazing 40 years.


Apple Guide

As a shopper entering the produce aisle, you are hit with a staggering variety of colors, shapes, and sizes; it really is a beautiful thing. We are very fortunate, as variety is such a wonderful privilege to have. The majority of folks have a good idea of what they like and what they are looking for when they shop. In the spirit of fun and adventure, we have developed an apple guide to help usher you through some of the more common and popular varieties we carry at Wheatsville. You can match your preferences and needs with a different variety than your regular “go to” apple. Here they are in deliberately unbiased alphabetical order:


Color varies from orange to red over a yellow background. Tart/sweet flavor, with a hard/crisp texture. Great for snacking and baking.


This variety was introduced to the U.S. from Japan in the 1980s; currently, the U.S. produces more of this extremely popular apple. Fuji’s have a very sweet flavor with a hard/crisp texture. Excellent for snacking, baking, and salads.


Pinkish-orange stripes over a yellow background. Gala’s are sweet, with a delicate crisp texture. These have been one of the most popular apples at Wheatsville, and are primarily used for snacking and salads.


Golden color with a pinky blush. The flavor is sweet with subtle spicy notes and the texture is soft. They are great for baking or in salads.

Golden Delicious

Considered an all-purpose apple. Mellow sweet flavor with a delicate crispness. Great for snacking and baking. Really good for salads, as their flesh stays white longer than other apples.

Granny Smith

Green skin, with a really tart flavor. They have a hard/crisp texture. Great for salads and snacking. The apple for most pie bakers.


A relatively new and wildly popular apple; people frequently ask for these by name at the beginning of apple season. Excellent crisp texture with a juicy and sweet flavor. These are not as commonly cultivated as other apples (supply is lower but the demand is really high), which translates into a higher price.


These classic apples are deep red with a burst of golden/green around the stem and dappled gold "sparks". They are sweet/tart, crisp and juicy. Great for juicing and for snacking.

Pink Lady

Vibrantly colored pink skin. Firm and crisp flesh, with a fantastic tangy/tart flavor. These are my favorite apple for snacking. They also hold up really well when baked.

Of course, throughout the season we have other apple varieties (ambrosia, Jonagold, etc.) available, but this should be a good start at broadening your apple horizons. As always, please ask your friendly produce clerk for recommendations and samples.

Apple Recipes

Spiced Apple Bundt Cake

Total Time: 1 hour 15 minutes; 20 minutes active. Servings: 12

This nutty apple cake is perfect topped with a maple syrup glaze, too.

Pecan Filling Ingredients

1 cup chopped pecans
1/4 cup brown sugar, lightly packed
1 tsp cinnamon

Cake Batter Ingredients

1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1 1/2 cups whole wheat flour
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 cup brown sugar, lightly packed
1 tsp salt
1 tsp baking soda
2 tsp cinnamon
1 tsp nutmeg
1/2 tsp allspice
1/2 tsp ground ginger
2 eggs, beaten
3/4 cup vegetable oil
1 cup unsweetened applesauce
1 tsp vanilla extract
3 cups peeled and diced tart apples


  • Preheat oven to 350°F.
  • 1. To make the pecan filling, mix together the pecans, sugar and cinnamon in a small bowl and set aside.
  • For the cake batter, whisk together the flours, sugars, salt, baking soda and spices in large bowl. In a separate bowl, mix together the eggs, oil, applesauce and vanilla. Add the wet mixture to the dry ingredients and stir just until blended. Fold in the diced apples.
  • 2. Grease the Bundt pan, spoon half the batter into the bottom of the pan, sprinkle evenly with the pecan filling and top with the remaining batter. Place in the oven and bake for 45-50 minutes. Check for doneness and continue baking if needed. Let the cake cool in the pan before turning it out
  • Serving Suggestion

Perfect for a casual gathering, this cake is extra-special when glazed. Just mix together 3/4 cup powdered sugar and 1 tablespoon each of maple syrup and apple juice (or milk) and drizzle it over the cooled cake. Top with chopped pecans if desired.

Gingered Beet and Apple Salad

Total Time: 30 minutes.  Servings: 6

A great recipe for beet fans and beet hesitaters alike.


1 pound beets, peeled
1 apple (about 1/2 pound)
1/4 pound carrots, peeled
1/2 cup fresh parsley, minced
2 Tbs apple cider
2 Tbs apple cider vinegar
1 Tbs fresh ginger, minced
2 Tbs olive oil
Salt and pepper to taste


1. Using the shredding blade of a food processor or a grater, shred the beets, apple, and carrots. Mix well with the remaining ingredients. Season with salt and pepper. Serve immediately or refrigerate to let the flavors blend.
2. Try using other varieties of beets, like golden or chiogga beets,for an even more colorful salad.

Serving Suggestion

Pair this sweet vegetable slaw with salty or spicy dishes flavored with miso or tamari, or serve as a side to hot-and-sour soup or pork.


Local Vendor Spotlight: Bola Pizza

We’ve been carrying Bola Pizza here at Wheatsville since July 2012. Jamie Bowers, co-owner of Bola Pizza with her partner Christian Bowers, talked to us about their business.

1. What inspired you to make pizza and how long did it take for your business to take off?

We started having pizza parties at our house when our friends started getting married and having kids. It was a good way to get people together. It was even more fun when Christian started inviting some food bloggers he knew. We were invited to do the Green Corn Project Fall Festival that year (2010) and that was our real start. We were invited to the Susutainable Food Center’s Downtown farmers market and started catering. Frozen pizzas were launched by persistent customer demand—thank you for the persistence!!! We weren’t sure about doing a frozen pizza at first because they’re not known to be very good. The frozen pizzas are still in the process of taking off. We are a super small company, but growing every year. This is probably the first year frozen pizzas are self sustaining.

2. What are some of your favorite things at Wheatsville?

We love the range of local products, especially eggs, cheese, fresh produce. I love to look through the personal and household sections. Wheatsville always has so many unique and beautiful things. I’m also addicted to the southern fried tofu!

3. Do you have anything new in the works that you would like to share with our patrons?

We are working on developing two new pizza flavors. We have also had requests for a frozen or refrigerated bread product that we are testing.

4. What is behind the name Bola and is there a story?

I got my first dog, Bola, from the Williamson county shelter when I was 19. I like to say we grew up together. I started making pizzas around the same time. Later, when I was in school at UT, I hosted pizza parties. My friends spoiled him feeding him the crusts (aka pizza bones). Years passed, then Christian and I decided to relaunch the pizza parties at our house. We used his special dough recipe and Bola was just as spoiled by our guests. Bola loved his pizza crusts and all the attention he would get at parties. Unfortunately, he didn’t make it to the founding of our pizza business, so we named it after him.

5. Is there is anything else you’’d like to share with our owners?

Christian came up with our three day cold fermented dough recipe because it tastes so good. I learned later from a nutritionist that it’s also very good for you. As the structure of the dough is developing, it is are also breaking down the gluten in the flour. So it’s much lower in gluten than a standard bread or pizza crust. The process also starts to break down the flour itself which allows your body to process the protein in it. Not being able to digest the wheat protein is what causes gluten intolerance. Flour quality is a big issue as well. We use King Arthur which has no bleach, no bromate and is non-GMO. King Arthur farmers are not allowed to spray Round Up on their crops as is standard practice with most of the wheat industry. We are committed to using the highest quality ingredients. Our other suppliers are: Andrew & Everett, Bel Gioso, Applegate, Niman Ranch, Kitchen Pride and organic crushed tomatoes from California.


Driscoll Berries

UPDATE 9/9/16:

As of this week , Familias Unidas por La Justica has officially agreed to an election and negotiation process for a collective bargaining agreement with Sakuma Bros Berry Farm and have called for an end of the boycott, and all boycott activities.

Here is the official statement:

Dear Supporters,

As of today we have officially agreed to an election and negotiation process for a collective bargaining agreement with Sakuma Bros Berry Farm. Thanks to your tireless efforts we are entering into this next phase of our union’s development with hope and determination. At this time we are calling for an end of the boycott, and all boycott activities. Out of respect for the process and our memorandum of understanding with the company please do not contact past, present or potential customers, purchasers, sellers or users of products coming from Sakuma Bros Berry Farm to convey criticism of any and all aspects of Sakuma’s business and operations.

Please stay tuned at the Familias Unidas por La Justica Facebook page for updates.

Thank you,
Ramon Torres
Felimon Pineda

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